500 Words – Day 014 – What Disease? -1048 words-

From this day forward, I will proclaim that there is no such thing as disease. That is not to say that there aren’t disorders of function(disfunction) within the human experience. Surely there is and we have all experienced disorders to one degree or another.

In other words, I am going to do my best to remove the term disease from my linguistic arsenal because I believe it to be problematic. Problematic in that it allows for a continued building up of ideas and language that takes us further away from the truth of what disease really is. An advanced state of aging. A problem that is a result of our body lacking the vital energies needed to repair or replace the components that we are wearing out. To say it another way, we are using up our body’s resources faster than they can be replenished.

And so in some sense, the word disease becomes an expensive paywall that prevents us from understanding what is really going on. And this disease is simply the first paywall or locked door that keeps us from really understanding what is really going on. Once you are convinced that you have a disease and you have gone through that door, it is further separated out into many other doorways and dim passages by which the initial problem becomes even more confused, obscured, blurred, and specialized into other, even scarier sounding disorders and diseases that become even more difficult to understand. This then ultimately leads us down the road to needing a doctor to guide us as blind people through the perilous straights of murky medical terminology. By the time the common man gets to this point they simply don’t know what to do. And in many cases, their primary care doctors know little more.

From this point, specialists who hold the keys of knowledge hidden behind the doors of specialties and specific diagnoses aren’t really able to help us better understand what is going on simply because they lack the time or skills needed to easily teach us in plain language what is really going on within our body. And thus we simply trust them in their decision-making processes that landed us in their care in the first place. And once most people get to this point there is little they can do other than simply say okay, submitting ourselves to a course of treatment that isn’t necessarily going to get us back to a state of homeostasis. To a place of normalcy where our body can once again be in its default state of organic and biological flow where everything is working with ease.

And this then leads us back to life…

There is only life and life exists regardless of our consciousness of it. We get to participate in it for a period of time. A span. A spectrum of existence that begins with what we humans call birth, and that existence has a temporal ending that we call death. Metaphorically speaking, we are simply an act if you will. A scene in a movie or play that makes up the whole of our individual lives. Our act or scene is a story that has many stages in between its temporal beginning and end. One story; yet two natures. One that is physical and the other that is spiritual. One is the story of our physical body and the other is that which we call our consciousness. Yet, both are a part of the same individual story that makes up each individual human life. And it is all an animated existence powered by electrical energy.

Our physical body is an organic, carbon-based life form that has been drawn up, gathered together, animated, and electrified as a utilitarian, beneficial, and necessary part of life here on Earth. We are here for a reason. In some sense acting as a counterbalance to another factor that exists within the realm of life on Earth.

So where does disease fit into all of this talk of man’s nature? What if I told you that disease is simply a metaphor for aging that has been used as a marketing tool in some sense? Well, that’s exactly what it is. The marketing of an idea that at the very least implies that there is something going on in our body that is out of our control that needs some form of external input, whether by ourselves or the hands of another.

So let’s just remove the word disease from our common use of language and just call it what it is then. Simply aging.

Beginning somewhere between conception and birth, Aging has been defined as a steady decline or reduction of physiological function that leads to increased susceptibility to diseases that will ultimately end in biological death.

Beginning –> Aging/Disease –> Death/End

When compared to other mammals, humans have what appears on the surface to be a longer lifespan. Approximately 120 years according to what humans have defined as a solar year consisting of 365 1/4 days.

Sidenote: I would like to argue that all mammals within their individual context from their own perspective experience the same amount of perceptible time known as a lifespan regardless of how humans define time. The idea that a day to a human would be something like a week to a dog, as an example. This might explain why a dog is so happy to see its human that has been gone on a two-week vacation. To us humans, it has only been two weeks, but to that dog, perhaps, it has been something akin to us having been gone for almost 2 months time.

Standard evolutionary models of aging are explained as the full potential of our body’s ability to repair or replace cells that would allow for continued existence. The idea is that over time, what we call natural selection through a process called senescence, or the deterioration of age begins to exert less effort in the removal of our spent cells. Our body simply loses its will to take out the trash if you will.

This brings me back to what we have classically called disease. And this is the basis by which I would like to suggest that we stop using this negative, pejorative term for what is simply the process of aging.

500 Words – Day 013 – Towards a Better Future for Humanity -500 words-

Along my journey to better understand how humanity can live to at least 120 years of age with a body that looks and feels no more than a healthy and robust 34, I continue to re-examine my core beliefs.

A foundation of those core beliefs is that my beliefs, no matter how well-formed, long used, or revered, will always be subject to change based on new information that comes to light which could improve the overall process, means, and methods by which I can attain my longevity goals.

You see, I am not concerned with the journey as much as I am the fruits of that journey, both along the way and at the end of the harvest where my elements ultimately rejoin the dust of the earth from where my elements once came.

I am a part of the Earth and in some sense an extension of it by an intelligence greater than my own that had a purpose in my utility to the greater overall goal which I understand to be the fullness of life that makes up organic life on Earth.

In my understanding, there is no individual outside of our unique role in the overall singularity of life on Earth, which in reality could be just another single living cellular structure in a vast network of living cells in a greater universe, multiverse, or even omniverse that we are yet to even understand that exists well beyond our field of dreams, much less vision.

And yet I lay my head down at night thinking of how we can live a longer, fuller life. Are my thoughts original? Likely not considering the billions and billions of people that live here on this biofilm we call Earth. Is there anyone that is 100% on the same thought path as I am? It is not likely, but I imagine there are many that are following at least part of that path with the same ferocity.

I imagine the world we live in as a grand, vast, and dense symphony of thought that contains many players that have similar goals as myself, yet we lack a greater director or conductor that could lead us to a more beautiful and harmonious thought process. What if someday there would come a time that an individual could rise up to become that great orchestrator of information to lead humanity back to a fullness of life before we rejoin the elements that gathered together to make us what we are?

I look forward to that day and sometimes even have a silly inkling that maybe I could be that person. But even if I am not, I will keep pushing forward knowing that someday it will happen. And considering our technological future that is racing ever faster towards a greater artificially intelligent world, it may be that a singular human may not be that great orchestrator, but simply a programmer that writes the code that sparks the great symphony that will lead us toward that better existence.

 

500 Words – Day 012 – Racquetballs, Lipids(fats), and Cellular Health

Everything that we put in our mouths influences our cellular health and function. And it is the nutrients, or foods, that we eat that, after being assimilated, become the building blocks of our cellular and metabolic structures.

Back in the year 1997, I remember a very distinct conversation I had with a friend of the family by the name of Jim Brice. I had just started working out at 24 Hour Fitness and he was the only person I knew that was somewhat of a health guru. Back then we called them health nuts.

I contacted him because I was wanting more information about protein and how I could build bigger muscles without having to spend too much money on a bunch of unnecessary supplements. He moved the conversation pretty quickly from protein powders to cellular structure and why building healthy cells was the first step to building bigger muscles. What he said next has stuck with me for the last 25 years. And he painted a brilliant word picture to illustrate.

He told me that our cells need to be like brand new racquetballs and as soon as he said that, I knew exactly what he meant.

If you are not familiar, let me explain. A brand new racquetball is shipped directly from the manufacturer, packaged in a vacuum-sealed container, to ensure the highest quality product for its intended use. A brand new racquetball is soft, supple, pliable, yet rigid in structure. When the package is opened, it whooshes as the outside air rushes inside. And that is when a racquetball is at its highest useful quality. If you’ve ever held one in your hand, you’ll know what I’m talking about. It’s all downhill from there though as the ball begins to oxidize as pliability gives way to structural rigidity.

When attempting to understand how sufficient fats are necessary to maintain cellular health and therefore, whole creature health, one needs to first understand what our cells are made up of.

      1. Fats
      2. Proteins
      3. Carbohydrates
      4. Vitamins
      5. Minerals

This does not only apply to humans, but it also applies to the foods that we eat. We, quite literally, are what we eat. Or so we’ve been told. But it may actually be more accurate to say that we are what our microbiome eats, which of course is the foods that we eat. That is to say that we are or should be considering first and foremost that there is an intermediate step between our stomach and the nutrients that find their way into our bloodstream. And that intermediate step consists of many trillion micro-organisms and organelles that inhabit our intestinal tract just below our stomach.

So, in a sense, when we feed ourselves, we are technically acting as a banquet server for those intermediary life forms that participate in the digestion process that allows us to assimilate the nutrients from our food.

This brings me to that dreaded F word that is lacking in many whole-food/plant-based diets. Fats. Some would suggest that we don’t need to consume what they refer to as overt fats, like avocado, nuts, seeds, and oils. However, our internal cellular structures require these to function properly. They are necessary and deficiencies will eventually show up. Not right away, but over time. It may even take a good year before we start noticing changes on the surface. That thing we see in the mirror.

The following is an extensive list. I personally abstain from a number of things on this list. Those things will be marked with an asterisk(*).

      • avocadoes
      • canola oil*
      • cashews*
      • olive oil
      • peanut butter*
      • peanuts*
      • sesame oil
      • sesame seeds
      • chia seeds
      • corn oil
      • fish (especially fatty fish, for Omega-3 fatty acid)***
      • pumpkin seeds
      • sunflower oil
      • sunflower seeds
      • safflower
      • soybean oil
      • walnuts

The reason why fats are important is that they help maintain a semi-permeable state of our cellular structures, allowing pliability and nutrient transport across the cellular barrier. In contrast, saturated fats do not function in like manner. They result in the cellular membranes becoming rigid. This is not optimal in that it results in the limited functionality of our cells.

All this to say that we need to be consuming a sufficient amount of fats in our daily diet. But not just any fats. We need to be consuming a sufficient amount of the right kind of fats. And I’m sure you noticed that the list above was primarily plant-based. The exception is fatty fish which this author DOES NOT recommend for optimal health for those on a whole-food/plant-based diet. However, there is some research that would suggest a very small amount once per week may provide some additional benefits to those 65 years of age and above.

Michael J. Loomis

500 Words – Day 011 – Fruit, Soup, Salad and Time-Restricted Feeding -2919 Words-

-2919 Words- -Reading Time: 12 Minutes-

On December 01, 2020, I began my vegan journey. A diet that would no longer depend on any animal-based nutrient sources. And I don’t see myself ever going back to that way of eating. In this day and age, there is just no justification for it as research, revealed knowledge, and an abundance of sourcing options have made it possible to no longer have to depend on keeping animals for regular consumption of things like milk and eggs.

Notice I mentioned consuming milk and eggs and that I didn’t mention eating meats on a daily basis as many do in this post-modern era of refrigeration and the convenience offered by fast food, butchers, and grocery store chains. Go back just 200 years to the early 1800s and it becomes clear why most people were not eating meats the way we do today in the modern world. It just wasn’t feasible. People were eating a lot more bread, plant-based whole foods, along with milk and eggs which were sustainable food sources for those that could afford the convenience of keeping chickens and milk-bearing animals like goats and cows.

Simply put there just was no option for eating a single meal that contained a pound or less of beef like there is today. And why would you kill the cow or goat for a few good meals when it could provide you with milk for an extended period of time. And hunting larger game was, I imagine, much less fruitful without the rifled barrel of a long-range rifle. If you wanted to eat animals it would have been in much smaller amounts. And things that were much smaller in size that were not sufficient sources of eggs or milk. Things like fish, small birds, and other small animals. But still, not something that would have been an available day in and day out fare unless you lived in a vibrant coastal area where fishing had been commercialized. And that fish would have been much healthier to eat than the fish available at our stores and restaurants today.

Early on as a vegan, I found myself amongst a group that was eating a diet that consisted of all plant-based whole foods that were completely uncooked. This limited things even further because a lot of things in the plant world that would need cooking to be properly assimilated were also no longer on the menu. Things like legumes, potatoes, sweet potatoes, leeks, onions, garlic, shallots, and most nuts. This also meant that good old sourdough bread with vegan-based butter, garlic powder, and brewers yeast was off the menu. Oh man, I missed that one. They also promote the idea that we don’t need any additional salts whatsoever. That wasn’t so tough, considering everything I was eating was fruit.

This group of what is called Natural Hygienists also recommend drinking only distilled water in that it is the healthiest of all forms of water. Bye-bye coffee and tea. That was a little rough at first. Even though historically mankind has not had access to mechanically distilled water until the last couple hundred years. Rainwater would have been the exception, but most humans throughout the ages got their drinking water from rivers and wells which were far from being distilled. Some sources contain significant amounts of electrolytes or minerals. The only thing I ate for the next year that didn’t fall within this mindset was a quarter cup of homemade hummus as a part of my salads.

This lifestyle and diet were very cleansing, to say the least. I found that it was not as difficult to follow as some do. I read many accounts of people that really struggled with this. That was not the case with me. One thing that might have made it easier for me was everything I read on the topic. The first thing I read on the topic was a whopping 2295 pages called The Life Sciences Health System written by a Natural Hygienist by the name of T.C. Fry. It was the curriculum for the school that he opened and operated American College of Health Science in Texas, which offered a voluminous correspondence course detailing Fry’s views.

When I began reading this document I found it rather difficult to follow as it was only available in PDF format with no easy way to bookmark it. So I decided to utilize my programming and web development skills to set up a website on my server utilizing the same software Wikipedia uses to serve up its website. That way it would then be easier to read through in a more digestible format along with a robust search engine and an easier way to print portions of the text as needed. That document can be found at https://terrain.wiki. This effort made it much easier for me to read through and that way it would be available for others around the world as well.

This diet did amazing things to bring my body back to a state it had never been in before. My body had cleansed itself of much toxicity that I didn’t realize many decades of eating animals along with indulging in too much other good stuff like alcohol, tobacco, salt, caffeinated beverages, etc., had done. I felt amazingly clean internally and externally. I even feel much more sober-minded than I could have ever imagined possible. Which lead me to another question. Were this diet and lifestyle intended to be a permanent solution or just a medicinal tool to fix a toxic overload? Which lead me back around to my prior studies on historical diets as they relate to longevity, human lifespan, and the idea of living to 120 years and beyond with a body that looks and feels no more than middle-age.


I also began to re-examine the works of Dr. Valter Longo, an Italian-American biogerontologist, cell biologist, and author of the book, The Longevity Diet. He is also famous for his studies on the role of time-restricted feeding and nutrient response genes on cellular protection, aging, and diseases. His views and approach to longevity as it relates to aging are amongst the best approaches I have found. Not only to reach our fullest potential of 120 years but how that relates to disease in our body as a complex system. He does this by basing his studies on 5 pillars.

  1. Complex systems like airplanes and automobiles.
  2. Centenarian studies as found in our oldest living populations(Blue Zones), which I will address later.
  3. Clinical studies, such as can be found at the National Institutes of Health.
  4. Biology of aging, focusing on the cellular and molecular processes that contribute to aging and age-related diseases.
  5. Epidemiology, the who, what, when, why, and where of health and the progression of disease in defined populations.

I, like Dr. Longo, have also spent much time examining complex systems and how they can be great tools to our understanding of how the human body works. Especially refineries and waste treatment plants considering our body does both of these things in the processing of our caloric intake.

“Dr. Valter Longo is the Edna M. Jones Professor of Gerontology and Biological Sciences and Director of the Longevity Institute at the University of Southern California –Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, Los Angeles, one of the leading centers for research on aging and age-related disease. Dr. Longo is also the Director of the Longevity and Cancer Program at the IFOM Institute of Molecular Oncology in Milan, Italy. –https://www.valterlongo.com/

If you are looking to make some meaningful changes to your diet that will help improve your lifestyle and ultimately your longevity, I highly recommend his book, The Longevity Diet. It is well worth the read and time spent.


Around the same time, because of Dr. Longo’s research, I also reflected on my previous studies of the Blue Zones and the Blue Zone diets in particular. None of which are marked by any kind of fruitarian diet. Not to say that these Blue Zone communities found around the world aren’t eating fruit, but they are not making it their mainstay. It is however a part of a well-balanced whole-food plant-based diet fed from locally grown and sourced produce that is not shipped in from all different parts of the world in limited selections as we see in the Western world of convenience we have become accustomed to.

Here is what these Blue Zone diets look like.

  1. 95% of your food comes from a plant or a plant product.
  2. Very limited non-processed free-range meats. (note: This author chooses to abstain from all animal-based foods.)
  3. Eat no more than 3 eggs per week(non-factory raised). (See above note on the author.)
  4. Eat at least a half cup of cooked beans daily.
  5. Avoid foods with added sugars.
  6. Snack on nuts.
  7. If you eat bread, choose sourdough or whole wheat.
  8. If a label is needed to tell you what you are eating, don’t eat it. Whole foods.

While people in four of the five Blue Zones consume meat, they do so sparingly, using it as a celebratory food, a small side, or a way to flavor dishes. About 2 ounces per serving and about 5 times per month. One study that has been following 96,000 Americans since 2002, found that the people who lived the longest were not vegans or meat-eaters. They were “pesco-vegetarians,” or pescatarians, people who ate a plant-based diet including a small portion of fish, up to once daily. In other Blue Zones diets, fish was a common part of everyday meals, eaten on average two to three times a week.

https://www.bluezones.com/2020/07/blue-zones-diet-food-secrets-of-the-worlds-longest-lived-people/


Why is soup in the title you ask? Because I believe they are the best way to get the fullest complement of nutrients that our body needs that cannot be fully appreciated on a completely raw diet. And there are many thousands of years of evidence that soups were a significant component of our ancestral diets.

These days I am glad to see that soups are a part of the Blue Zone diets. They are such a great way to gain access to a greater amount of nutrients that are bound up in many of the darker leafy greens, legumes, roots, and tubers. There is a long history of humans consuming soups as a practice with evidence going back about 20,000 years. Of course, back then they were using animal hides, watertight baskets, and hot rocks to cook the soups until they invented vessels fashioned from clay.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soup & –https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.1218643

And then there is this notion that we need to be eating three meals per day along with snacks in between. Where did we get this idea from?

The Industrial Revolution and the rise of non-home-based schooling, or public and private schools where there were benefits to schedules and larger amounts of resources dedicated to quantifying time in blocks rather than the fluidity afforded on a farm for example.

Let’s think about that for a moment. Are we still at the height of the Industrial Revolution? No, we are not. As a matter of fact, we are rapidly speeding towards an automated end of the labor vacuum that was created as a result of industrialization. We created a whole host of machines that needed a whole host of human operators that had previously worked in a more agrarian manner. As a result, we needed people that could be available and full of energy for long days at the mill or in the coal mine and they would need energy in the form of food to remain productive. They would also need a system by which their children would be occupied while they were attending to all this new mechanization that needed human operators.

Thanks to an education crusader named Horace Mann, Massachusetts became the first state with compulsory school laws in 1852. Mann also led the charge to change schools from a one-room schoolhouse that taught all children together to a multilevel format that separated children into separate grades by age.

The Industrial Revolution came about in the latter half of the 18th century and became a reality of life on a global scale by the middle of the 19th century. Pretty clearly our modern iteration of schooling was no longer simply about basic education, but about attending to children that no longer had both parents around the home or homestead and these children would need to be prepared for the reality of an industrialized world.

Move forward again another 100 years into the mid-1950s. A new world where many common diseases and disorders were being solved by a better understanding of how the human body worked. And how certain food fortifications could eliminate many of the common disabling malnourishment maladies like pellagra, rickets, beriberi, scurvy, and goiter. All of a sudden, we were improving human life expectancy in the industrialized nations, and as a result of a further industrialized WWII America in support of the war effort, victory gardens and wartime canning became a patriotic symbol promoted heavily by Uncle Sam. A simple way to ensure that there wouldn’t be any food shortages on the homefront in a time when more industries were supporting the war effort and rationing was in effect.

Alas, another outgrowth of the Industrial Revolution would be the birth and growth of large grocery chains that would eventually supplant the need for local, smaller retailers and we now have a world that made it very easy to never have to look back at a world of toiling over the soil for foods. And why would we, when we could go to a store and conveniently purchase packaged and preserved foods, supported by our industrialized city jobs that were providing convenient jobs and reasonable pay in exchange for a more relaxed 40 hours per week thanks to the growth of labor unions.

And that is when the Standard American Diet planted the seed for the world of managed health care that we have today resulting from our modern metabolic diseases caused by overconsumption of convenience foods. And in just two short generations we moved from dietary deficiencies to a world of metabolic disorders as a result of conveniently accessible prepackaged foods leading us into a world of metabolic disorders. In a post-WWII world where both mom and dad have entered the workplace to chase after the American Dream(nightmare), convenience has become King and the healthy homestead has been supplanted by factory farming, mono-crops, soil degradation, and conveniences of all manner which has left us an extremely unhealthy lot.


A recap of what I believe; at this point in time. My AT&T position.

I do believe that there is likely a way to eat that is most beneficial as part of the bigger picture of aging and what Dr. Valter Longo refers to as ‘Juventology’ rather than ‘Aging’. I believe that a whole-food plant-based diet will get humans closest to achieving our fullest potential of 120 years. I believe that there is a place in the overall picture where eating fruit only, or a frugivore diet has its place as a medicinal or cleansing mechanism that should be practiced from time to time, especially when feeling under the weather, but not for long-term maintenance. I believe that we would best be served by doing our best to rotate what produce we eat as much as possible, avoiding eating the same things more than 2 days in a row, and best if only once in a three-day period to avoid any level of dysbiosis.

-Dysbiosis is characterized as a disruption to the gut microbiota homeostasis caused by an imbalance in the microflora, changes in their functional composition and metabolic activities, or a shift in their local distribution. Wikipedia

I believe that the best timeframe by which to eat would be to follow the equatorial sun. Don’t let it kiss your lips if the sun can’t kiss it first. Eat only from 6 am to 6 pm, regardless of where you live on Earth. I believe a feeding window of 12 hours per day is the sweet spot where the fewest health problems will arise. Gallbladder problems tend to show up on the lower end of feeding windows; 8 hours or less. Metabolic disorders; diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular diseases and such begin showing up at 15 hours or more. I believe it is always better to eat heavier foods/meals earlier in the day and lighter, easier-to-digest foods for the last meal of the day; maybe even just a snack.

I believe the best way to determine what the optimal human diet should look like is to mimic the diet and lifestyle choices of the longest living people on Earth, wherever they are found.

Finally, I hesitate to suggest a frugivore model of eating as a long-term solution as some vegans do. I find it problematic in light of our current state of produce quality and access to enough variety to make it feasible. Although, some would disagree with me on this point. However, as I mentioned above, I do believe it is a great medicinal tool for occasional cleansing as needed. And I believe the best way to overcome these nutritional deficits is through soups containing as many dark and vegetables, dense and complex leafy greens, beans, roots, and tubers.

And never go nuts with nuts. Try to limit them to at most every other day and only one quarter cup serving. Personally, the only nuts I eat are walnuts. Not because of flavor, but because they are the healthiest of nuts. Peanuts and almonds are the two least healthy. I would avoid them.

And when in doubt, always eat less than more.

500 Words – Day 010 – Fat’s, Carbs, Confusion, and Misconceptions -808 Words-

-808 Words- -Reading Time: 3 Minutes-

A gram of carbohydrates contains 4 calories. A gram of fat contains 9 calories.
Carbohydrates and fats are not the same things, but they are not as different as some might believe or even teach.

Fats are organic compounds that, LIKE CARBOHYDRATES, are composed of the elements carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and oxygen (O), arranged to form molecules.

Fats, like carbohydrates, are composed of the same elements. Their elements are simply arranged differently for a reason. Both are used for energy within the body, but for different purposes and processes in fueling and sustaining the whole human creature.

While simple carbohydrates(Carbon-Oxygen-Hydrogen) are the body’s primary source of fuel that requires the least amount of metabolic energy to assimilate, fats(Carbon-Oxygen-Hydrogen) have to be broken down into fatty acids for assimilation.

Where they differ is that fats are broken down into fatty acids to make cell linings and hormones. Carbohydrates both simple and starchy are not.

Carbohydrates are water-soluble and are the most readily available source of dietary energy for all living creatures great and small. Fats on the other hand are not soluble in water but require other organic enzymes to break them down. Fats are also the way our body stores energy for later use when carbohydrates may not be readily available.

Our body needs a lot of energy to do all of its work and it is important that we get enough of ALL of the kinds of energy that our body needs, from both carbohydrates and fats. Not just one or the other.

Carbohydrates are the simplest fuel source for our body that we can equate to gasoline for our cars. Where fats are like the crude oil that our refineries use in the refining process that ultimately provides us with gasoline for our cars. And just like in our crude oil refineries our body draws other necessary and useful elements from the fats we consume that are necessary and beneficial for overall human health and wellness. Just think of all the other wonderfully useful petroleum products we have that we take for granted from a barrel of crude aside from the gasoline that we put in our cars. Things like paint, makeup, clothing, shampoo, conditioner, and even the lenses for our glasses, just to name a few.

Carbohydrates are like gasoline and fats are like the crude oil by which gasoline can be extracted along with other useful components. This is why fats contain 9 calories per gram versus carbohydrates containing only 4 calories per gram.


And this is why it is important to get ENOUGH of the RIGHT KIND of energy sources from both carbohydrates and fats. Again, not just one or the other. If we are not consuming enough of the right kinds of fats our body cannot maintain proper cellular structure and overall cellular health, wellbeing, and ultimately the desired longevity of years free from disease.

And when it comes to functionality they also each contribute to different processes. Like different players on the same baseball team. Fats also help in assimilating vitamins like A, D, E, K, while the glucose converted by the metabolism of carbohydrates fuels this process.

Fats also assist in regulating things like hormone production and protecting organs as a whole and at the cellular level. Fats also help in maintaining a steady body temperature. Whereas, the undigestable fiber in carbohydrates helps maintain blood sugar levels, cholesterol levels and is a major contributor to removing waste from our body, which fats cannot do.

So, as you can see fats and carbohydrates are both very important components in the body’s overall activities that require energy and they both serve different purposes within the bigger picture of life.

Around 20-35 percent of our dietary intake should be from fats and 60-75 percent of our dietary intake should be from carbohydrates. This amount will fluctuate based on our body’s needs at any given point in time.

There are a lot of well-meaning teachers on our modern social networks and elsewhere that suggest diets that are too low in what we call fats. As I said, they mean well, and they can be 100% correct about everything else they suggest about the foods we eat, but ultimately miss the bigger picture, leaving their students in an eventual malnourished state.

Please be sure to do your own research. Don’t just listen to talking heads and do what they simply say to do. Not even me. Invest your own time, your greatest asset of all into your own knowledge of this or any other subject. If you do, I can assure you that you will value your convictions and decisions to a much higher level than the ones that were given to you at no cost. We humans just don’t tend to value that which we do not invest in. Invest in your education, it will always pay you rich dividends.

500 Words – Day 009 – Moving Away From a Raw Vegan Diet -1375 Words-

-1375 Words- -Reading Time: 6 Minutes-

I was asked this question on Facebook.

What has your experience been since moving away from a raw vegan “fruitarian” lifestyle/diet?

Two BIG changes that I feel are a move in the right direction are…

1. Better bowel movements
2. No more trips mid-night trips to the bathroom

I really had no expectations that these two things would take place. But frankly, both are tremendously beneficial results in my book. My bowels appear to be much happier and I’m getting a better quality of sleep. There are a couple of reasons for this that I will explain below. My gut just feels more at peace. It’s kind of hard to explain.

What foods I have changed.

1. Sweet Potatoes
2. Vegetable Soup
3. Daily Green Boost

What else I have changed.

I start my day with my largest caloric intake so that by the end of the day my body is better able to find rest before I go to sleep at night. I start heavier at breakfast(break fast) and then I go lighter as the day goes on. I am currently on a rotation where I have a large salad one day, a big bowl of vegetable soup the next day, and a big bowl of sweet potatoes on the third day. This makes the most amount of sense to me. It’s also easier.

On the days I eat my salads and soups, I supplement Daily Green Boost with bananas mashed up along with shelled hemp seeds and chia seeds. It’s like a deep dark green banana-flavored tapioca pudding. I know some will decry foul with my combining fruits with fats, but I would disagree on a physiological level. Our body in its infinite wisdom combines both lingual lipase and alpha-amylase in our salivary glands together precisely for the digestion of both starches and fats. And nature wouldn’t create a perfect fruit like an avocado which contains both fats and carbohydrates if they weren’t supposed to be consumed at the same time. But alas there will be some that suggest we shouldn’t be eating avocados. I disagree with them on this point as well. Just don’t eat too much avocado in one sitting. Go easy on this wonderful fruit.

On the days I eat sweet potatoes, I will have a large and hydrating banana and berry smoothie for lunch with coconut water and coconut milk combined with Daily Green Boost.

I still eat fruit throughout the day, but just not as much. I also have changed my eating window to something called Time-Restricted Feeding. Some of you may call it Intermittent Fasting, but I believe the former is a better way of understanding what it is that is happening physiologically. Because until someone stops putting calories into their body, they are not fasting. And I believe that even the use of the word fasting implies some greater benefit or inflated sense of reality that in the long run will hinder its adherents down a path that is of limited success and possibly other systemic failures including gallstone formation, which I will address later.

Therefore, I suggest that we would best be served to use the most accurate terminology, not only in this endeavor but in all things we do, because it is our own internal dialogue that ultimately matters the most.
Intermittent Fasting as most are calling it has gained much popularity as a mode of beneficial lifestyle change, but I believe that there is still much confusion out there about how to properly execute it as a program.

Once again, I want to stress the importance of calling it what it really is. Time-Restricted feeding.
One teacher, Dr. David Sinclair of Harvard University, whom I highly respect for his hard work in helping people not only overcome disease but also live longer lives practices an extreme version of this by limiting their eating to one meal per day. Most, however, limit their eating window to somewhere between 6 and 8 hours. And it is reported that this method produces favorable results. I on the other hand tend to agree with Dr. Valter Longo of the University of Southern California(USC), that the optimal feeding window is something more along the lines of 12 hours per day, and that it be held to consistently for the greatest outcome.
Though I don’t remember the exact reasoning from his fabulous book, The Longevity Diet, I do remember that he had one especially good reason for 12 hours per day being the optimal feeding window. Preventing gallstone formation.

How does gallstone formation happen?

Our bodies are very conservative and seem to be rather fond of the fruits of their labor. Bile(gall) is one of them. Bile is a yellowish-brown to a dark-green solution that is continually produced in the liver that serves to digest fats in the small intestine. And it’s as if our body refuses to waste this product, bile, that is created by storing and concentrating it in our gallbladder until the next time we partake in a meal. While being stored in the gallbladder, the bile is further concentrated by the removal of water. Hence, the formation of gallstones if it is stored for too long before being used again.

The solution is simple and should be quite obvious. Eating even a small amount of food that contains fat sends a message to the gallbladder to release bile so that it can do the work it was created for. If you are not eating for 18 hours a day or eating a diet that consists of little or no fat, you are just asking for gallstones and a strong possibility of surgical intervention to have your gallbladder removed according to Dr. Longo. A course of action that further hinders our body’s ability to attain its fullest potential of 120 healthy years.

As well, though researchers haven’t figured out exactly why studies do indicate that there is a correlation between those that forego breakfast having a much greater incidence of disease and overall mortality.

So to wrap this up, there are clear problems related to shortened feeding windows of 6 to 8 hours that can lead to gallstone formation and a possible need for surgical intervention. And on the other end of the spectrum for those eating 15 hours a day or more, other metabolic problems begin to arise along with sleeping disorders related to the practice.

My advice is similar to Dr. Valter Longo’s. Simply follow the rhythm of the equatorial sun as the sweet spot is found in the middle. If it cannot be kissed by the sun before entering your mouth, don’t let it kiss your lips. Just remember 12 and 12.

As I promised above my thoughts on why my urinary and bowel movements have improved as I have implemented these changes.

As I mentioned in my prior two short essays, “Why Am I No Longer a Raw Vegan?” & “Fruit, Soups and Salads”, there is a proper balance of electrolytes that ultimately keep our body in a state of euhydration(sufficient hydration).

If you have ENOUGH of ALL of the electrolytes that the body requires, it will remain in a greater state of ease and homeostasis. Our bowels will move like they are supposed to and when they are supposed to because our hydration levels will be optimized. Our urinary frequency will be reduced because our kidneys will not be having to work overtime to constantly be reducing the amounts of some electrolytes to balance out ALL of them. No more insignificant visits to the bathroom and especially the ones in the middle of the night. Why? Because our body will be in a state of homeostasis where it can find rest and work on its healing and restorative processes.

Finally, Time-Restricted Feeding isn’t a quick fix as much as it is a long-term lifestyle that is part of why the Blue Zones even exist and why those in these demographics are living longer more robust lives. Not only are they eating more of the right things, but their eating patterns are inherently more aligned with what nature intended for a body with a potential to live an active 120 years.

And if you need to lose weight, don’t change the foods you eat or restrict the window by which you feed; simply eat less over the same 12-hour span.

500 Words – Day 008 – Do You Know Squat?

I’ve been practicing it daily now for 3.5 years. I drop down and hold for a 30 count first thing in the morning upon greeting the morning sun.

This after peddling my legs while laying on my back 50 times. 50 leg extensions while holding my legs with my hands behind my knees and then 100 leg curls while on my belly. It’s my way to start the day and get the engines running full steam ahead.

I also do 15 squats at a time, sometimes multiple times per day, while holding on to the kitchen sink. I may do that many times a day, but at least once so that I can do a tremendous amount of squats a year. How can that not do something positive for the body?

At this point in my morning routine, I do a full-body lymphatic where I massage all of my limbs and torso towards the jugular veins in my neck. The purpose of this is to keep all of the intracellular and lymphatic fluids moving in a positive direction, back into general vascular circulation for better overall health. I’ve seen the benefits in my own life. Here is what I’ve noticed.

Overall improved skin/tissue quality which in turn improves color and appearance.

It reduces fluid retention and swelling by moving excess water and metabolic waste from the tissues back into the lymphatic channels where our immune system can do its best work.

I’ve also noticed a better texture across my skin overall along with a reduction in scar tissues. My suspicion is that this makes our body more efficient at healing its injuries and illness related to direct trauma and surgeries.

And of course, possibly the greatest benefit of all, it is incredibly relaxing.

I have a very lofty goal of making it to 120 years of age with a body that looks and feels no more than a healthy, robust 34. But wouldn’t that be fascinating if I got to see my birthday in the year 2116? I would love nothing more than to celebrate my birthday at 144 with a body that looked and felt no more than 24.

I’m simply growing a fully refurbished body. And it is gonna last. This time I’m doing it the right way.

Death was once my master. Now it has become my greatest teacher. A wicked man that I once was, obeying the dictates bearing the fruits of ignorance in my daily life. I had no idea the path I was traveling and where it was going to lead me. But I have repented and now I will not relent. I have found joy in knowing that I am no longer a victim of circumstance or just bad luck because of genetics. That life is not a roll of some celestial dice. That it is not something that is in every way out of my control. But something more comforting, knowing that there is a will in this thing called life that wants us to not only be healthy and wise but also bear much good fruit unto life itself.

We are here for a reason. Life does not waste its force where there is no return on investment. We are here for a purpose and it is my pleasure to serve that greater good even if I don’t yet fully understand the goal. And that is why I am here to serve.

And it all begins with some squats at the beginning of each and every day with the first kiss of the merciful morning sun that brings me life and the motivation to rise to the occasion.

500 Words – Day 007 – Our Inner Sea and Its Environmental Impact on Health

Our Inner Sea and Its Environmental Impact on Health

I am no doctor or scientist by any means but have been studying human physiology for 4.5 years as of January 2022, with a special interest in kidney function. This is because of two surgeries on my bladder and kidneys as a child.

Kidneys as I understand their function combined with the purpose of dialysis leads me to conclude that our kidneys are our body’s blowoff valves or wastegates if you will. They are in place to maintain the fluid or plasma levels of our body. This would be the primary function. Second, they also filter out excess electrolytes and other components like hormones from our plasma that would disturb fluid homeostasis. And third, they allow for excess hydration consumed to be released. We all know this because it happens when we drink too much of any good thing be it water, alcohol, Gatorade, etc.

Then there is our spleen. This organ is found in almost all animals classified as vertebrates. It is the body’s largest lymph node and as such, it is a key player in what we call our immune system. It fights disease, synthesizes antibodies, and produces white blood cells all while acting as a filter for the purification of our blood, removing all manner of microbes and red blood cells that are damaged or simply worn out.

Next in the lineup of our filter organs is our liver. The largest of all our internal solid organs it filters almost all of the blood in our body. 70-80% of total liver blood flow is fed by the hepatic portal vein with blood from the spleen, gallbladder, gastrointestinal tract, and pancreas. It breaks down complex compounds in our blood, such as over-the-counter, prescription and street drugs, alcohol, caffeine along with the nutrients from the foods we eat.

The lungs are also a filter of sorts. A two-way filter if you will. They do more than move oxygen in and carbon dioxide out of the body. They also act as filters. Mucus in your lungs catches and holds dust, germs, and other things that have entered the lungs. As far as their filtration function, carbon dioxide is the most important component that they remove from our plasma to keep the blood from becoming too acidic. In that sense, the lungs control your body’s pH balance by releasing carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide is a slightly acidic compound. It’s also a waste product produced by cells in the body as they use oxygen. The cells release it into your blood, and it’s taken to your lungs for clearance.

So, our kidneys are just one part of many functions of many organs in our body that maintain the overall homeostasis of our internal terrain and its body of water, stored primarily in our largest organ; our skin.

Our skin is important in maintaining body water levels and preventing water loss into the environment. It contains approximately 30% water, which contributes to plumpness, elasticity, and resiliency. The overlapping cellular structure of the stratum corneum and lipid content of the skin serves as “waterproofing” for the body. -https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2908954/

So as you can see, our body dedicates a lot of energy, effort, and organ tissue to maintaining a healthy circulatory system that is facilitated by our body’s inner sea, by a fluid we call plasma, spinal cord fluid, tissue fluid, or urine depending on where we find it. A fluid that our body makes at the rate of about 1/2 a liter per day.